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A Greener Vision Of Home

RRP $311.99

Suburban sprawl, advertising clutter, vast industrial plantations of spindly pines punctuated by stone-lined gutters in place of streams--this was the thoroughly modern landscape of Germany by the turn of the century. Most people ignored the devastating changes in their environment, or quickly rationalized them away as the price that had to be paid for "progress." But in 1904, three-quarters of a century before Greenpeace, one group arose that did not compromise on conservation: the movement for "homeland-protection," or "Heimatschutz."
Aesthetic or "romantic" ideas about the environment have often expressed valuable critiques of our all-too-utilitarian modern lifestyle. In the English-speaking world
John Ruskin and William Morris are well known for this kind of ecological antimodernism; a very similar aesthetic concern for landscape energized the "Heimatschutz" movement. Drawing on a wide range of archival and printed sources, many made accessible here for the first time, William H. Rollins shows that this was a broad-based middle-class reform movement that combined social egalitarianism with protection for the entire working landscape.
"A Greener Vision of Home" will appeal to readers in German studies and cultural studies and others interested in some of the roots and major strategies of today's highly visible environmental movement.
William H. Rollins is Lecturer in the Department of German, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.


Bringing The Movement Home

RRP $12.99

This story is part history and part memoir. It concerns my father, a Presbyterian minister, and what he went through during the period 1957 to 1970, when he gave himself wholeheartedly to move his middle-class, Midwestern congregations into action on behalf of the oppressed. In the course of events, my father was arrested, with twelve other white ministers from the North, in 1964, in Pike County, Mississippi, while protesting the county's refusal to register black voters. He spent one night in jail. The protest was in and out of the national news quickly, but it had a large impact on the town to which he returned, Athens, Ohio. He became the locus of controversy, a stand-in for the civil rights movement, and his church became the stage on which the struggle was played out in Athens. The story begins in Westerville, Ohio, in November 1957, with the performance of a minstrel show. It was a fundraiser performed by local citizens to benefit the varsity sports teams of the local college, Otterbein, and it was performed in Otterbein's auditorium, just down the street from First Presbyterian Church, of which my father was pastor. He thought minstrel shows were self-evidently bad and that it was his duty to say so. He wrote a column in the local newspaper upbraiding the citizenry for supporting the minstrel show. He was not naive. And yet he was surprised by the reaction. Public opinion strongly favored it. Members of his church were scandalized not by the minstrel show but by his speaking against it. With the brouhaha that followed publication of his newspaper column, my father gained three things: a reputation as an advocate for civil rights, the understanding that his ministry would provoke conflict, and his own commitment to go ahead with his eyes open. He was eventually forced to leave the Westerville church. His next pastorate was at First Presbyterian Church of Athens, a small city with a large university some eighty miles southeast of Columbus. He arrived in January 1963 resolved to engage the congregation and himself in the civil rights movement as deeply as possible. This story tells the story of my father's attempt to do this, and its consequences. I've been telling this story all my adult life-every month or two for the last forty-five years, I'd guess, usually a three-minute version. Besides being a kind of personal cornerstone story for me, I've always thought it had merit on its own as an exemplary story of the 1960s, the decade in which I passed my adolescence. Ever since then I've been promising myself that I would some day take the full measure of this story. This is it.


At Home With The Gopher Tortoise

RRP $19.95

At Home with the Gopher Tortoise: The Story of a Keystone Species teaches young readers about the gopher tortoise and the more than 360 different kinds of animals that depend on it for survival. From owls to rabbits, from skunks to scorpions, the gopher tortoise provides creatures with shelter, food, or a place to raise their young. In this fascinating tale of ecological interdependency, glorious illustrations reveal the gopher tortoise's world both below and above ground, showing children how the fate of one species is important to so many others.


Cirencester In Stone

RRP $15.99


A Hog Ate My Homework

RRP $17.95

Willie is bored again! The second grader is about to find out how he did on his first school report. The problem is he wasn't very inspired when he wrote it. He hoped no one would notice. But thanks in part to his fifth-grade sister Ashley, it seems like the whole world will! Can a trip to a family farm get him out of this mess? Will an old wagon re-ignite his creativity? Put on your work boots -- we're headed to the country! Willie has some work to do, and it could get very messy!



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